Noam Chomsky video is up, Steven Poole on mindfulness through technology, Sady Doyle on the politics of "Parks and Rec," and more

In case you missed it on The Baffler...
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Well hello.

If you weren't able to make it to our event in Cambridge last week (or if you were, and want to relive it ~in real time~), we now have the full video of Noam Chomsky and Kade Crockford's discussion of "The Tsarnaev Trial and the Rest of Us" up online on the Baffler site. (And here are some photos from the event, too.)

And if you missed it this week on The Baffler online, we featured Steven Poole's little ditty for issue 26, "Blips for Brains," about his misadventures with a piece of tech called "Muse" that promises to help him relax but accomplishes quite the opposite. Poole's piece is also illustrated with two beautiful illustrations by Mark S. Fisher.

Speaking of blips and brains, Dale Lately wrote this week for the Baffler blog about Silicon Valley's commodification of our memories, in a piece called "Nostalgia 2.0." Also on the blog, we've got Robert Appelbaum writing on Greece, Sady Doyle on the politics of Parks and Recreation, Scott Beauchamp on money in politics in '16, and much more.

Do enjoy,
The Baffler

Blips for Brains by Steven Poole (no. 26)
Democracy in Greece, for Now by Robert Appelbaum on the Baffler blog
WATCH: Noam Chomsky and Kade Crockford at the Baffler event "The Tsarnaev Trial and the Rest of Us." Full video online now.
The Utopian Vision of Pawnee, Indiana by Sady Doyle on the Baffler blog
Iowa Doesn't Matter by Scott Beauchamp on the Baffler blog
Flint's Dirty Drinking Water Conundrum by Mike Bivins on the Baffler blog
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